Catfishing On the Internet

Catfishing through dating sites

 

You’ve probably heard of “catfishing,” especially if you use social media or dating websites. Catfishing is when a person pretends to be someone else to trick another person. People who catfish do so for many reasons, including trying to prove a partner is cheating partner, using it to scam someone or using it to cyberstalk or cyberbully someone.

How it Works

Catfishers use social media sites to trick others. They often use dating sites, although other social media websites like Snapchat, Facebook and Instagram are used to make people think they’re someone else. Here’s an example from a dating website.

Joan signs up on a dating website. She fills out her information and posts her picture. Joan receives messages almost immediately. Joan has high hopes for meeting new people. She looks at pictures and answers messages. It’s not long before Joan notices strange behavior from some of the men. Here are some things noticed by Joan:

Bad English

Many scammers are not native English speakers. It’s obvious when you talk to a person who doesn’t know what words to use. Joan notices that they use the wrong words, can’t make full sentences, use the wrong tense, or confuse words like there, they’re, and their. Non-English speakers don’t usually use contractions.

Profile Pictures

Joan gets messages from people that don’t have a profile picture. Sometimes there is a real reason for not posting a picture, such as his job, but it usually means that the person is married or not who he claims to be.

Some men look like movie stars. If a picture looks professional or familiar, chances are it’s fake. Do a reverse image search app to find out if the person is real. You can upload the picture into an app or website and search.

The Catfishing Story

Scammers use the same stories over and over. Stories include the person losing his family in an accident, being stranded, or having lost his wife and being left with a young child. If a story sounds familiar, copy and paste some of it into a search engine.

Moving Too Fast

Scammers want money…fast. When catfishing, people will say anything to gain your trust and steal from you as soon as possible. Poetry, gifts and words of love are some ways in which a scammer will try to win you over. If you respond to the gestures, the scammer will try harder to win you over.

The Scam

Once a catfisher has gained your trust, he will ask you for something. It starts with something small, such as a gift card. If you give what he is asking for, the next gift will be something bigger and grow larger with each request.

Protecting Yourself

Fortunately, Joan reads a lot of articles about online dating  and catfishing and has prepared herself. She immediately refuses all requests for money or gifts, blocks unknown callers from her phone, and insists on meeting in public.

If you find yourself in a similar situation, proceed with care and trust your intuition

Applying for Online Loans

 Online Loans

Everyone needs extra cash from time to time. There are even times when things feel desperate. Applying for online loans might seem like a good idea – a quick fix – but they are often a source of trouble. Loans are offered by everyone from legitimate banks to credit cards to cash advance services. Due diligence and giving out the right information may save you from theft, fraud, or worse.

Red Flags

Red flags can be obvious, but may not be recognized by uneducated consumers. Before applying for a loan, check out the company thoroughly to make sure it’s legitimate. The Better Business Bureau is a good place to start. Research reviews from former and current customers. Check scam websites.

Seven Signs:

  1. The lender doesn’t request credit history. The first thing a reliable lender should ask for is your credit history. Real lenders want to know they are making a calculated risk. Before applying, you should have your credit history in front of you. Credit history is issued through three major credit bureaus: Experian, Equifax, and TransUnion. If you aren’t required to give your credit history, it’s a scam. They are interested in collecting high fees from late payments.
  2. The lender isn’t registered. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) requires registration for all lenders and loan brokers in the state(s) they conduct business. Verify the lender is legally permitted to process your loan.
  3. The lender requires a prepaid debit card. Some sites will require a prepaid card as collateral or insurance. Prepaid cards are untraceable and nonrefundable, so the scammers keep the money free and clear.
  4. The lender approaches you. Legitimate lenders advertise, but you should be suspicious of one that calls or shows up at your door. If you receive such a call do a free phone trace on iPhone to verify the number of the caller.
  5. Their website isn’t secure. If your antivirus or firewall software doesn’t catch it, you can tell a website is secure if it features a padlock symbol next to the URL. Also, a secure site will have an address with https://www… Instead of the typical http://www.
  6. The lender has no address. All banks and loan brokers have a physical address. Use Google Maps to pinpoint their location.
  7. The lender wants immediate action. Don’t give in to limited time offers, even if the lender promises to send the money the next day.

Reporting a Fraud

If you suspect you have been the victim of a fraud or identity theft due to an online loan offer, contact the Federal Bureau of Investigation Internet Crime Complaint Center.